Douglas Starnes

Douglas Starnes

Independent
Memphis, TN
@poweredbyaltnet

Douglas Starnes is a polyglot ninja and tech community influencer in the Memphis area making stuff that works on more than just the web. He specializes in the fields of mobile, cloud, data science and machine learning. Douglas is a co-director of the Memphis Python User Group and a board member of the Memphis .NET User Group. He is a frequent conference speaker who has delivered more than 20 featured presentations at more than 10 conferences over the past 4 years in a variety of citiies across the southeast United States. In addition, Douglas is an active participant in local user groups. He has also served as an organizer for PyTennessee, PyOhio and TechCampMemphis. Outside of being a geek Douglas is a trained composer, aspiring triathlete and avid Lego collector.

Douglas' Sessions

  • A Lap Around Xamarin.Forms

    While Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android are very useful, they only get part of the job done. The APIs for user interfaces are still platform specific and are not abstracted by Xamarin. And many times, the functionality of the user interfaces is the same, with the only difference being the platform specific look and feel. So developers end up violating the DRY principle by creating multiple codebases to implement the same UI concept on each platform. This is where Xamarin.Forms comes in. First, it abstracts the API for user interfaces taking code reuse from 70% across platforms to 90%. Second, it offers a XAML-based markup language for defining user interfaces. What can be created with Xamarin.Forms? It is estimated that about 80% of mobile apps can be created with Xamarin.Forms, especially LOB apps. The only exceptions are those which need fancy UIs or deep integration with the mobile platform. Of course, there are still cases in which you'll need a small platform specific feature and Xamarin.Forms provides a path to achieve that as well, while still maintaining only one UI codebase. Developers can create Xamarin.Forms apps in both Xamarin Studio and Visual Studio and Visual Studio even supports Universal Windows Applications.

    Speaker: Douglas Starnes

  • Kotlin: What's in it For You

    Who hates Java? Maybe that's a little harsh but who really likes it? Java is a great idea but the anachronisms of the language begin to get in the way. But Java is so widespread can you afford to ignore it? If you learn Kotlin, you can. Kotlin targets the JVM while affording developers advancements found in many modern languages while still leveraging existing legacy Java code. (Finally, operator overloading!) And Kotlin is the real deal too. It's been used in production for year but will be officially supported by Google in the next release of Android Studio. Kotlin is coming and it's time to get ready to meet it!

    Speaker: Douglas Starnes

  • Microsoft Azure Makes Machine Learning Accessible and Affordable

    This talk is different in that it's aimed at developers, but it's not really a code focused talk. First, it's about the concepts of machine learning. Second it's about Azure Machine Learning, mostly Azure ML Studio. ML Studio is a workflow designer where developers can create a machine learning workflow without having to understand the detailed math behind the algorithms. And because it's a cloud-based service running on Microsoft Azure, there is no need to purchase any more resources for any longer than you need them. So machine learning is both accessible and affordable to anyone. And once a workflow is complete, it can be deployed to a protected REST web service with just a few clicks.

    Speaker: Douglas Starnes